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Michael Innes - book author

Michael Innes was the pseudonym of John Innes MacKintosh (J.I.M.) Stewart (J.I.M. Stewart).

He was born in Edinburgh, and educated at Edinburgh Academy and Oriel College, Oxford. He was Lecturer in English at the University of Leeds from 1930-1935, and spent the succeeding ten years as Jury Professor of English at the University of Adelaide, South Australia.

He returned to the United Kingdom in 1949, to become a Lecturer at the Queen's University of Belfast. In 1949 he became a Student (Fellow) of Christ Church, Oxford, becoming a Professor by the time of his retirement in 1973.

As J.I.M. Stewart he published a number of works of non-fiction, mainly critical studies of authors, including Joseph Conrad and Rudyard Kipling, as well as about twenty works of fiction and a memoir, 'Myself and Michael Innes'.

As Michael Innes, he published numerous mystery novels and short story collections, most featuring the Scotland Yard detective John Appleby.

Michael Innes is the author of books: Death at the President's Lodging (Sir John Appleby, #1), Hamlet, Revenge! (Sir John Appleby, #2), Appleby's End (Sir John Appleby, #10), Lament for a Maker (Sir John Appleby, #3), The Daffodil Affair (Sir John Appleby, #8), The Weight Of The Evidence (Sir John Appleby, #9), The Secret Vanguard (Sir John Appleby, #5), There Came Both Mist And Snow (Sir John Appleby, #6), The Long Farewell (Sir John Appleby, #17), Appleby On Ararat (Sir John Appleby, #7)

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Author Books

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Title
Description
02
At Seamnum Court, seat of the Duke of Horton, The Lord Chancellor of England is murdered at the climax of a private presentation of Hamlet, in which he plays Polonius. Inspector Appleby pursues some of the most famous names in the country, unearthing dreadful suspicion.
03
By the way,’ said Appleby, ‘what is the name of this sta –’ He stopped, his question already answered. Straight before him, sufficiently lit by the yellow rays of a hanging lantern, was a boldly lettered board. He read the inscription: APPLEBY’S END.

Strange things have been happening in Snarl: missing animals have been replaced with marble effigies; ominous tombstones have arrived predicting future deaths. Detective Inspector John Appleby is travelling by train to consult on the case. His journey is interrupted, however, when the inscrutable Mr. Raven informs Appleby that he won’t make his connection, and seems more than keen to offer Appleby a place to sleep for the night.

Appleby is charmed by this kindness, but is soon plagued by second thoughts. As the train compartment fills, Appleby notices a striking resemblance between the passengers: the same long nose, the same cold eyes… soon he is faced with the entire Raven family. What could these strangers possibly want with Appleby?

As Appleby learns more about the Ravens and their novelist relative, Ranulph, he begins to suspect a connection to his case. Do the Ravens have sinister intentions, or are they the key to solving the mystery?

In this bizarre little town filled with curious characters and troubling tales, should Appleby feel safe, or should he have seen the signs?
04
When mad recluse, Ranald Guthrie, the laird of Erchany, falls from the ramparts of his castle on a wild winter night, Appleby discovers the doom that shrouded his life, and the grim legends of the bleak and nameless hamlets, in a tale that emanates sheer terror and suspense.
05
Inspector Appleby's aunt is most distressed when her horse, Daffodil - a somewhat half-witted animal with exceptional numerical skills - goes missing from her stable in Harrogate. Meanwhile, Hudspith is hot on the trail of Lucy Rideout, an enigmatic young girl has been whisked away to an unknown isle by a mysterious gentleman. And when a house in Bloomsbury, supposedly haunted, also goes missing, the baffled policemen search for a connection. As Appleby and Hudspith trace Daffodil and Lucy, the fragments begin to come together and an extravagant project is uncovered, leading them to South American jungle.
06
Meteorites fall from the sky but seldom onto the heads of science dons in redbrick universities; yet this is what happens to Professor Pluckrose of Nestfield University. Inspector Appleby soon discovers that the meteorite was not fresh and that the professor's deckchair had been placed underneath a large, accessible tower - he already knew something of academic jealousies but he was to find out a great deal more
07
Successful minor poet, Philip Ploss, lives a peaceful existence in ideal surroundings, until his life is upset when he hears verses erroneously quoted as his own. Soon afterwards, he is found dead in the library with a copy of Dante's Purgatory open before him.
08
Stunning Belrive Priory, consisting of a mansion, park and medieval ruins, is surrounded by the noise and neon signs of its gaudy neighbours - a cotton-mill, a brewey and a main road. Nevertheless, Arthur Ferryman is pleased to return for a family Christmas, but is shocked to discover that his cousins have taken up a new pastime - pistol-shooting. Inspector Appleby arrives on the scene when one of Ferryman's cousins is found shot dead in the study, in a mystery built on family antagonisms.
09
Lewis Packford, the great Shakespearean scholar, was thought to have discovered a book annotated by the Bard - but there is no trace of this valuable object when Packford apparently commits suicide. Sir John Appleby finds a mixed bag of suspects at the dead man's house, who might all have a good motive for murder. The scholars and bibliophiles who were present might have been tempted by the precious document in Packford's possession. And Appleby discovers that Packford had two secret marriages, and that both of these women were at the house at the time of his death.
10
Inspector Appleby is stranded on a very strange island, with a rather odd bunch of people - too many men, too few women (and one of them too attractive) cause a deal of trouble. But that is nothing compared to later developments, including the body afloat in the water, and the attack by local inhabitants.