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Lindsay Hunter - book author

Lindsay Hunter lives in Chicago. She is the author of Daddy's and DON'T KISS ME. Read her blog at lindsayhunter.com.

Lindsay Hunter is the author of books: Ugly Girls, Eat Only When You're Hungry, Don't Kiss Me: Stories, Daddy's, Three Things You Should Know About Peggy Paula, Kitty, The New Black, Forty Stories, 15 Views of Orlando, Choose Wisely: 35 Women Up To No Good

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Author Books

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01
Perry and Baby Girl are best friends, though you wouldn’t know it if you met them. Their friendship is woven from the threads of never-ending dares and power struggles, their loyalty fierce but incredibly fraught. They spend their nights sneaking out of their trailers, stealing cars for joyrides, and doing all they can to appear hard to the outside world.With all their energy focused on deceiving themselves and the people around them, they don’t know that real danger lurks: Jamey, an alleged high school student from a nearby town, has been pining after Perry from behind the computer screen in his mother’s trailer for some time now, following Perry and Baby Girl’s every move—on Facebook, via instant messaging and text,and, unbeknownst to the girls, in person. When Perry and Baby Girl finally agree to meet Jamey face-to-face, they quickly realize he’s far from the shy high school boy they thought he was, and they’ll do whatever is necessary to protect themselves.

Lindsay Hunter's stories have been called "mesmerizing. . . visceral . . . exquisite" (Chicago Tribune), and in Ugly Girls she calls on all her faculties as a wholly original storyteller to deliver the most searing, poignant, powerful debut novel in years.
02
A father searches for his addict son while grappling with his own choices as a parent (and as a user of sorts)

In Lindsay Hunter’s achingly funny, fiercely honest second novel, Eat Only When You’re Hungry, we meet Greg—an overweight fifty-eight-year-old and the father of Greg Junior, GJ, who has been missing for three weeks. GJ’s been an addict his whole adult life, disappearing for days at a time, but for some reason this absence feels different, and Greg has convinced himself that he’s the only one who can find his son. So he rents an RV and drives from his home in West Virginia to the outskirts of Orlando, Florida, the last place GJ was seen. As we travel down the streets of the bizarroland that is Florida, the urgency to find GJ slowly recedes into the background, and the truths about Greg’s mistakes—as a father, a husband, a man—are uncovered.

In Eat Only When You’re Hungry, Hunter elicits complex sympathy for her characters, asking the reader to take a closer look at the way we think about addiction—why we demonize the junkie but turn a blind eye to drinking a little too much or eating too much—and the fallout of failing ourselves.
03
An explosive story collection from a bold, blistering new voice
With broken language, deep vernacular, unexpectedly fierce empathy, and a pace that’ll break your granny’s neck, Lindsay Hunter lures, cajoles, and wrenches readers into the wild world of Don’t Kiss Me.

Here you’ll meet Peggy Paula, who works the late shift at Perkin’s and envies the popular girls who come in to eat french fries and brag about how far they let the boys get with them. You’ll meet a woman in her mid-thirties pining for her mean-spirited, abusive boyfriend, Del, a nine-year-old who is in no way her actual boyfriend. And just try to resist the noir story of a reluctant, Afrin-addled detective. 

Self-loathing, self-loving, and otherwise trapped by their own dumb selves, these characters make one cringe-worthy mistake after another. But for each bone-headed move, Hunter delivers a surprising moment that chokes you up as you peer into what seemed like deep emptiness and discover a profound longing for human understanding. It’s the collision of these moments that make this a powerful, alive book.

The stories of Don’t Kiss Me are united by Hunter’s singular voice and unflinching eye. By turns crass and tender, heartbreaking and devastatingly funny, her stories expose a world full of characters seemingly driven by desperation, but in the end, they’re the ones who get the last laugh. Hunter is at the forefront of the boldest, most provocative writers working now.
04
Lindsay Hunter tells the stories no one else will in ways no one else can. In this down and dirty debut she draws vivid portraits of bad people in worse places. A woman struggles to survive her boyfriend's terror preparations. A wife finds that the key to her sex life lies in her dog’s electric collar. Two teenagers violently tip the scales of their friendship. A rising star of the new fast fiction, Hunter bares all before you can blink in her bold, beautiful stories. In this collection of slim southern gothics, she offers an exploration not of the human heart but of the spine; mixing sex, violence and love into a harrowing, head-spinning read.
06
The first ADP.PDF foray into comics! With the dynamic duo of Lindsay Hunter & Nathan Holic.
07
The New Black is a collection of twenty neo-noir stories exemplifying the best authors currently writing in this dark sub-genre. A mixture of horror, crime, fantasy, science fiction, magical realism, and the grotesque—all with a literary bent—these stories are the future of genre-bending fiction.

The table of contents includes the following authors and stories: Stephen Graham Jones, "Father Son, Holy Rabbit," Paul Tremblay, "It's Against the Law to Feed the Ducks," Lindsay Hunter, "That Baby," Roxane Gay, "How," Kyle Minor, "The Truth and All Its Ugly," Craig Clevenger, "Act of Contrition," Micaela Morrissette, "The Familiars," Richard Lange, "Fuzzyland," Benjamin Percy, "Dial Tone," Roy Kesey, "Instituto," Craig Davidson, "Rust and Bone," Rebecca Jones-Howe, "Blue Hawaii," Joe Meno, "Children Are the Only Ones Who Blush," Vanessa Veselka, "Christopher Hitchens," Nik Korpon, "His Footsteps are Made of Soot," Brian Evenson, "Windeye," Craig Wallwork, "Dollhouse," Tara Laskowski, "The Etiquette of Homicide," Matt Bell, "Dredge," and Antonia Crane, "Sunshine for Adrienne."

Edited by Richard Thomas.
Foreword by Laird Barron.
08
A new ebook collection of short fiction from Harper Perennial, edited by Cal Morgan. Contributors include Jess Walter (Beautiful Ruins), Lindsay Hunter (Daddy's), Blake Butler (There Is No Year), Ben Greenman (Celebrity Chekhov), and Kyle Minor (In the Devil's Territory).
09
From the neon strip of Little Vietnam to a desolate Albertsons parking lot, 15 Views of Orlando takes the reader on a secret tour of the City Beautiful. Told by 15 authors in a series of loosely linked fiction, the story is a (successful) experiment in setting, theme and community. The book also features interviews with Philip F. Deaver, Lindsay Hunter and six other contributors, as well as a Florida Lit manifesto by John King.

All the proceeds from books sales will benefit Page 15, a local children’s literacy nonprofit that provides free tutoring and creative writing programs to Orlando public school students.

Limited run. Available for purchase at burrowpress.com/15-views-of-orlando
10
Choose Wisely: 35 Women Up To No Good is a feminist anthology of dark fiction co-edited by H. L. Nelson and Joanne Merriam. Containing 35 stories of bad women and "good" women who just haven't been caught yet, it features Joyce Carol Oates, Aimee Bender, Diane Cook, and 33 other fearless women writers.