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David Small - book author

Librarian Note: There is more than one author in the Goodreads database with this name.

David Small is the recipient of the Caldecott Medal, a Christopher Medal, and the E. B. White Award for his picture books, which include Imogene's Antlers, The Gardener, and So, You Want to Be President? He lives in Mendon, Michigan.

David Small is the author of books: Stitches, Imogene's Antlers, Home After Dark, George Washington's Cows, Ruby Mae Has Something to Say, Paper John, Hoover's Bride, Fenwick's Suit, Eulalie and the Hopping Head, Imogene Comes Back!

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Author Books

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Title
Description
01
One day David Small awoke from a supposedly harmless operation to discover that he had been transformed into a virtual mute. A vocal cord removed, his throat slashed and stitched together like a bloody boot, the fourteen-year-old boy had not been told that he had cancer and was expected to die.

In Stitches, Small, the award-winning children’s illustrator and author, re-creates this terrifying event in a life story that might have been imagined by Kafka. As the images painfully tumble out, one by one, we gain a ringside seat at a gothic family drama where David—a highly anxious yet supremely talented child—all too often became the unwitting object of his parents’ buried frustration and rage.

Believing that they were trying to do their best, David’s parents did just the reverse. Edward Small, a Detroit physician, who vented his own anger by hitting a punching bag, was convinced that he could cure his young son’s respiratory problems with heavy doses of radiation, possibly causing David’s cancer. Elizabeth, David’s mother, tyrannically stingy and excessively scolding, ran the Small household under a cone of silence where emotions, especially her own, were hidden.

Depicting this coming-of-age story with dazzling, kaleidoscopic images that turn nightmare into fairy tale, Small tells us of his journey from sickly child to cancer patient, to the troubled teen whose risky decision to run away from home at sixteen—with nothing more than the dream of becoming an artist—will resonate as the ultimate survival statemen.
02
The family doctor, the school principal, and even Imogene's know-it-all brother, Norman, fail to resolve her dilemma. Imogene, the cook, and the kitchen maid, however, make the best of things, finding unusual uses for Imogene's new horns. Meanwhile, the problem appears to be solved when Imogene awakes the next morning antler-free. But the family (and the reader) are in for a surprise when Imogene comes down to breakfast.
03
Thirteen-year-old Russell Pruitt, abandoned by his mother, follows his father to sun-splashed California in search of a dream. Suddenly forced to fend for himself, Russell struggles to survive in Marshfield, a dilapidated town haunted by a sadistic animal killer and a ring of malicious boys who bully Russell for being “queer.” Rescued from his booze-swilling father by Wen and Jian Mah, a Chinese immigrant couple who long for a child, Russell betrays their generosity by running away with their restaurant’s proceeds.
04
"George Washington's cows were kept upstairs,
And given their own special room.
They never were seen by light of day.
No matter for what or by whom."

These cows are just the beginning of George's problems. To be sure, his hogs are helpful around the house, but it irks Martha when their parties are better than hers. And then there are the sheep--all of them smarter than Tom Jefferson, with degrees (no to say "sheepskins") to prove it. What's a Father of his country to do?

David Smalll puts a hilariously sticky fingerprint on the well-polished veneer of American history, showing readers what really went on in the home of our first President.
05
Illus. in full color. Miss Ruby Mae Foote, governor of Nada, Texas, has a big ambition: to deliver a message of universal peace and understanding at the United Nations. Problem is, she's tongue-tied. To help her out, her nephew Billy Bob invents the "Bobatron" (a hatlike device made out of kitchen utensils). When Ruby Mae puts it on she becomes eloquent--and successful.
06
Paper John moves to a little town by the edge of the sea and makes his living folding beautiful paper flowers, birds, and boats. HE is so skilled he even makes a paper house to live in. And he is so gentle and good-natured that the townsfolk all agree he could get along with the devil himself. But when a devil comes to town, Paper John's skill and patience is put to the test as he does battle with the devil and his one devilish trick. Lively full-color paintings add to all the fun.
David Small is the illustrator of many books for children, including Anna and the Seven Swans, a Booklist Editor's Choice and a School Library Journal Best Book for 1984. His most recent book, Imogene's Antlers, is a 1986 Reading Rainbow Feature Selection. This is his first book with Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Mr. Small lives in Kalamazoo, Michigan.
07
Let the Scholastic Bookshelf be your guide through the whole range of your child's reading experience -- laugh with them, learn with them, read with them!

Category: Humor
"Her name was Elektra. He bought her a ring / And he didn't buy her just any old thing. / A grapefruit-size diamond was what Hoover chose / In a size that would fit on the end of her hose."
In this hilarious, wacky "love story," the clueless Mr. Hoover gets married to Elektra, the vaccuum cleaner of his dreams. After being pronounced man and appliance, the two go on a honeymoon -- where Elektra promptly runs off with a lawn mower. But all is not lost for Mr. Hoover, who soon finds a much more conventional bride.
08
Fenwick discovers that the new suit he has purchased has a life of its own.
09
A reissue, in a larger format, of the first picture book by Caldecott Medal-winning illustrator David Smalls.
10
35 years after Imogene woke up with antlers, she's back! The follow up to the classic, Imogene's Antlers by Caldecott Award winning David Small.

One day, Imogene woke up to discover that she had sprouted antlers overnight. Her family was confused, her mother was distraught and there was no explanation. Then she woke up the next day and they were gone, but were replaced by something just as curious.

Now Imogene has found she has a new curious feature every day. Some are helpful, some are sweet, some are downright strange. But all of them upset her poor mother who just can't handle how improper it all is. Yet even as Imogene discovers something new every day, she always remains Imogene at heart.

David Small returns to one of his most beloved characters in this charming tale.